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Nokia 6210 Navigator Symbian smartphone. Announced Feb 2008. Features 2.4″ display, 3.15 MP primary camera, 950 mAh battery,
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Quick Overview
  • This Mobile runs on Symbian OS 9.3, S60 rel. 3.2 powered with 369 MHz ARM 11.
  • This Mobile has 3.15 MP, AF, LED flash and has Videocall camera Secondary camera
  • This Mobile has 2.4 inches, 17.8 cm2 (~35.3% screen-to-body ratio) inches display TFT, 16M colors.
  • This Mobile has 120 MB, 128 MB RAM of internal memory.
  • This Mobile has Removable Li-Ion 950 mAh battery (BL-5F)
  • This Mobile has Mini-SIM sim
  • Compare prices for Nokia 6210 Navigator in Saudi Arabia:
Lowest price for Nokia 6210 Navigator is .00 SAR

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GENERAL
2G Network GSM 850 / 900 / 1800 / 1900
3G Network HSDPA 900 / 2100
Sim Mini-SIM
BODY
Dimensions Discontinued
Weight 117 g (4.13 oz)
DISPLAY
Display Size 2.4 inches, 17.8 cm2 (~35.3% screen-to-body ratio)
SOUND
AlertTypes Vibration; Downloadable polyphonic, MP3, AAC ringtones
LoudSpeaker Yes
3.5mm jack No
MEMORY
CardSlot microSD, up to 8 GB (dedicated slot)
Internal 120 MB, 128 MB RAM
DATA
GPRS Class 32, 107 / 64.2 kbps
EDGE Class 32, 296 / 177.6 kbits
Speed HSPA 3.6/0.384 Mbps
WLAN No
Blue Tooth 2.0, A2DP
USB miniUSB 2.0
CAMERA
Camera Primary 3.15 MP, AF, LED flash
CameraVideo 480p@15fps
CameraSecondary Videocall camera
FEATURES
OS Symbian OS 9.3, S60 rel. 3.2
CPU 369 MHz ARM 11
Sensors Accelerometer, compass
Messaging SMS, MMS, Email, Instant Messaging
Browser WAP 2.0/xHTML, HTML
Radio Stereo FM radio, RDS
GPS Yes, with A-GPS; Nokia Maps
Colors Black, Red
BATTERY
Battery Removable Li-Ion 950 mAh battery (BL-5F)
StandBy Up to 220 h (2G) / 240 h (3G)
TalkTime Up to 3 h 40 min (2G) / 2 h 48 min (3G)
MISC
SAREU 0.76 W/kg (head)
7 days in smartphones: Dear Microsoft, please don't eat my Android phone

Your princess isn't in another smartphone

It's Friday. You're giddy with excitement. It can only mean one thing…7 days in smartphones is back again!

Forget being "social" with your so-called "friends", stay here in the dark with as we try to make you laugh. Once. It's the best we can hope for.

It's-A-Not-Me, Mario!

Nintendo is finally entering the smartphone market. We've waited years to say it and – phwoar– that felt seriously good.

The bad news is it isn't exactly as we'd anticipated, it looks like Mario and co will be taking a back seat to make way for new mobile franchises.

Link on a horse

The move comes after a partnership with developer DeNA who will have free reign over the Nintendo IPs but won't be aiming to create ports of Wii U or 3DS games.

Instead it'll be focusing on new titles – is that really such a bad thing? Well, probably - these things rarely go well.

Even though the Mario, Zelda, Pokémon, rinse and repeat formula can sometimes feel a little tiresome, Nintendo wanting to enter the world of Candy Crush doesn't necessarily fill me with glee.

That said, if anyone can do it with style and create some new engaging characters to go on the journey with, surely it's Nintendo. You hear that Iwata? My credit card is waiting and I'm ready and waiting to make micro payments now.

Microsoft wants your Android!

Windows 10 news now smartphans: Microsoft wants to bring its new operating system to your Android smartphone.

Wait, WHAT?!

Yeah, that's right, Microsoft wants to wrangle your unrestricted OS, throw up a bunch of electric fences and restrict the amount of apps you'll be able to download.

Microsoft Windows 10

OK, maybe not quite like that, but the Softies have announced plans to allow users to trial a custom ROM on the Xiamoi Mi 4 that removes all trace of the Android OS for an almost complete version of Windows 10.

It's Microsoft's attempt to steal users from the Android ecosystem and switch them over to Windows Phone, but it'll be some seriously hard work considering the reduced number of apps available on the platform.

Will anyone actually choose to make their Android run Windows Phone? Only time will tell.

Or, well, no.

One hoof forward

One hoof, two hoof, three hoof, four, repeat. Walking was becoming easier by the day as Winston's long recovery continued to drag.

"You're doing great, just a few more steps" reassured the nurse ready to catch him at the slightest sign of a stumble.

One hoof, two hoof, three hoof, four, done. Winston collapsed into the really rather long wheelchair, sweat dripping from his mane. The nurse looked at him sympathetically, stroking his fetlock, and said tenderly: "That's enough for one day... let's get you back to your bed."

Wheeled back to the side of his bed, he clambered onto the sheets and forced himself to look at the odd, faceless black brick that seemed to be staring him from the bedside table.

Over the preceding days and weeks he'd gradually been building the confidence to explore the Apple iPhone and take control of his first ever keyless smartphone. OK, the Storm didn't have any keys... except it did. The whole display was a key. It was glorious, but now it was gone.

In that time he'd learnt how to turn on the display, unlock it, take a few snaps around his hospital room and even get used to the onscreen keyboard. Apps were still a weird experience: he'd finally realised how to download them, but was bewildered by how many there were. Inside, he still missed the choice of just 11 that used to populate BlackBerry App World.

Then the day came: it was time to go home. His rehab was over. It was time to venture back out into the world, a robotic unicorn sent out to live once again.

With an NHS prescribed iPhone 6 Plus in his left hoof, a small bag of belongings in his right, it was time to flip open Apple Maps, type in Mobonia, get confused as to why it wasn't there (before finding it simply on Google Maps) and continue on his journey, but where next?

A flagship for the Shin!

Although likely not the best smartphone you've ever owned, the Samsung Galaxy S ended up being one of the major competitors to the iPhone 4.

Here are some of the highlights from the one and only JK Shin announcing it way back in March 2010. Kevin from Twitter is definitely NOT reading from an auto-cue.

YouTube : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g9m4-CbvuR8

Strange press shot of the week

Sony Camera Lens

*Read in your best David Attenborough voice*

Here we see a young stubble-styled hipster out of his normal Shoreditch habitat, discovering the phenomenon of fresh berries.

This specimen, likely known as Atticus to his friends, has lost his Polaroid camera and decides to join the modern world with the Sony QX100 Lens Style Camera for smartphones and tablets.

He attaches it to a Sony Xperia Z2 to snap some blackberries and then ask all his Instagram friends what they are.

Sadly he has yet to receive a response as none of his followers could identify them through the Nashville filter.

Retro video of the week

YouTube : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B1YBrVevn4w

"You know there's a sexier way to connect to the web." That was the slogan of the Siemens C35i.

It seems the company wanted to sex up its image – if that's even possible with a NSFW name like Siemens – so it employed some proper hot bods to strut around the emptiest, weirdest lit nightclub in all of Germany.

If you can discern what actually happens at the end of the video please let us know in the comments as our tiny little tech focused minds can't work it out.

Proper bits from the site

Remember the best phone you ever had? It was likely the Nokia 3310 and we went on a journey through time to bring you back the best details we could find on it – just look how pretty it is!

EE has replaced its Orange Wednesday's deal with a significantly less exciting streaming proposition. We don't know exactly what kind of films it'll include just yet but we can speculate 70% of them will include Steven Seagal.

Dyson has invested in some new technology to make your smartphone's, and your vacuum cleaner's, battery last even longer.

And finally the auto-tuned Robocop look-a-like that is Will.i.am has teamed up with the fashion brand Gucci to bring you yet another horrible "smartband".








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UPDATED: iOS 9 release date, features and news

iOS 9 release date, compatibility and features

iOS 9 is Apple's next iPhone and iPad update that brings a smarter Siri, public transit directions to Maps, true tablet multitasking and other new built-in apps.

It's Apple's next big project between April's Apple Watch launch and September's expected iPhone 6S unveiling, and developers can download it today.

iOS 9 makes a big push for stability, a smaller download size and legacy phone and tablet compatibility. That older iPhone and iPad you have will work with this update if it runs iOS 8.

New iOS 9 features consist of redesigned built-in apps and premiers new ones. Here's what to expect.

iOS 9 release date

iOS 9 is available today to those enrolled in iOS developer program, keeping with Apple's same-day delivery pattern. Of course, becoming registered developer requires paying a fee.

iOS 9 release date

Everyone else who wants it for free has to wait until either the public beta in July or later this year when it's expected to launch with the new iPhone. Think: September.

That one- to three-month wait can be a good thing. iOS 9 beta 1 will be buggy and unfinished. The best features typically don't launch until the gold master version, anyway.

iOS 9 compatibility

iOS 9 is proving to be more inclusive than previous iOS versions. Apple is choosing to make this update compatible with older iPhone, iPad and even iPod touch devices, too.

iOS 9 is compatible with all iOS 8 devices

Basically, if your dated hardware ran iOS 8, it can run iOS 9. Of course, your milage may vary, as older Apple devices are known to be slower or more buggy after such updates.

But overall, it's good news, as older phones and tablets aren't getting muscled out. The iPhone 4S and iPad 2 are safe, for now, and a few 30-pin dock devices live on.

Smarter Siri

Siri in iOS 9 is getting the much-needed smarts to rival Google Now. Apple's personal assistant understands the word "it" within context and brings proactivity to the operating system.

iOS 9 release date

For example, if you're talking about a topic with someone in iMessages and ask Siri to "Remind me about this later today," it'll scan the open app and try to understand what "this" means.

iOS 9 proactivity puts even more at your fingertips through Siri. It suggests appointments to add to Calendar and pulls up photos based on location and time with the sound of your voice.

Siri's location-based knowledge appears to be most promising when you're out and about. Plugging in headphones at the gym? It'll offer the Now Playing interface right on the lockscreen.

Plug it into your car? It'll bring up that audiobook you were listening to before. It'll even tell you when to leave for an appointment across town, a feature that has made Google's app for iOS a must-have.

iOS 9 release date

One of the most convenient new iOS 9 features is giving context to random numbers that call you, diving into your email to see if it can match the digits. Goodbye, telemarketers.

Siri already takes over one billion requests a week, according to Apple. That should only increase now that iOS 9 makes Siri 40% faster and 40% more accurate.

Apple Pay expands

Apple Pay has been touted as a success, but so far has been limited to the US. That all changes when the mobile payment platform launches in the UK next month.

iOS 9 release date

The official Apple Pay UK release date is happening in July and it'll be backed by nearly 70% of credit and debit cards there, including Lloyds Bank, Bank of Scotland and HSBC.

Canada and China are rumored to be next up for the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus mobile payment platform, but the company didn't announce that broad of an expansion just yet.

iOS 9 release date

In the US, Apple Pay is now backed by 2,500 US banks and, this fall, rewards and store-issued cards will be a part of the mobile wallet. This is an idea we liked about Android Pay at Google IO last month.

Considering these newfound iOS 9 capabilities, Apple is renaming Passbook (the app where Apple Pay resides) to Wallet.

Apple News apps

In addition to getting rid of Passbook in favor of Wallet in iOS 9, Apple is replacing Newsstand with News, and it's very familiar if you're a fan of magazine-style news aggregators.

iOS 9 release date and features

Apple News for iOS 9 is Flipboard, HTC BlinkFeed and Feedly wrapped into one app. It features a personalized feed and is coming to US, UK and Australia at launch.

No telling if publishers will wrap their content in the fresh Apple News format. The advantage to you, however, is more clear: your data will remain anonymous, apart from your Apple ID, says the company.

Apple Maps

Apple Maps is sometimes unavoidable, even if you're a dedicated Google Maps users. Siri and built-in apps still open directions up in the default navigation app. That won't change.

iOS 9 release date and features

The good news is that iOS 9 is going to make Apple Maps better, and maybe even tolerable. In its first major refresh since 2013, the app now includes long-awaited public transit directions.

That means routes for buses, trains, subways and, yes, even ferries are part of Apple Maps. This goes live this fall in Baltimore, Berlin, Chicago, London, Mexico City, New York City, Philadelphia, the San Francisco Bay Area, Toronto and Washington D.C.

Notably, it'll support directions for 300 cities in China, a huge emerging market for the iPhone, including Beijing, Chengdu and Shanghai.

Multitasking for iPad

iOS 9 brings true multitasking to its newer iPad tablets, and we're not talking about the "multitasking" app switcher that premiered with iOS 4 back in 2010.

iOS 9 release date and features

iPads will finally be able to handle more hefty productivity tasks. That's to the delight of enterprise users who prefer iOS for personal use, but feel forced to opt for a Microsoft Surface Pro 3 or Android tablet at work.

There are three ways to view multitasking windows on an iPad. Slide Over brings a second app from the side so you can answer a text or write something in Notes. It's just as easy to slide away.

iOS 9 release date and features

There's also a special Picture-in-Picture mode that puts videos and FaceTime calls in the corner of the display when the home button is pressed. From there, you can use any other app while watching the video. Google's YouTube app for iOS works this very same way, at least within that specific app.

Both Slide Over and Picture-in-Picture are compatible with newer iPads: iPad Air, iPad Air 2, iPad mini 2 and iPad mini 3. The last mode, Split View, is an iPad Air 2-only affair.

iOS 9 release date and features

Split View is the mode that everyone imagines when they hear the word "multitasking." It enables two apps to be open side-by-side and they're both active at the same time with full multitouch support.

New iOS 9 keyboard

Apple launched what it called its "best keyboard yet" with the iOS 8 QuickType, and it's trying to one-up that statement with the iOS 9 keyboard.

The QuickType keyboard returns in iOS 9 with a vengeance

iPad's on-screen keyboard now features a built-in shortcut bar, which flanks the next-word suggestions above the QWERTY letter keys. Cut, copy and paste to the left; bold, italic, underline and attachments to the right.

That's better than having to hunt for these shortcuts in the second layer of the keyboard menu, and in a surprise move, Apple is making this default layout customizable and compatible with third-party keyboard apps.

Cursor control is now easier with a handy (or fingery) slide mechanic when using two fingers. It basically turns the iPad QuickType keyboard into an trackpad. It's way easier than hovering over the tiny cursor, trying to land in between letters.

Finally, shortcuts are coming to wireless keyboards so that you can interact with apps using their own built-in shortcut keys. Pressing and holding the Command, Option or Control key brings up the shortcut list.

Under the hood

New features are exciting and all, but iOS 9 needs to run better than iOS 8, which had a series of WiFi and battery drain problems from the get-go. Some users are still complaining.

iOS 9 release date and features

Longer battery life is a chief concern of iPhone users, but they can squeeze out an extra hour thanks to a new Low Power mode. Apple says iOS 9 pulls switches you didn't even know existed to save juice.

You may be able to install iOS 9 this time around without deleting all of your photos. It'll take about 1.3GB, whereas iOS 8 needed massive 4.5GB of internal storage. That was awful on a 16GB iPhone.

CPU and GPU usage will be more efficient thanks to iOS 9, further improving performance, and security is said to be stepped up. Hopefully that means last year's iCloud hack isn't going to be an annual incident.

Not mentioned during today's Apple WWDC keynote, iOS 9 will feature a "Move to iOS" app that makes it easier to wirelessly switch from an Android device to a new iOS phone or tablet.

Apple's software-focused WWDC keynote showed a lot of promise for iOS 9, even if it's an incremental update. Google's Android M is taking the same cautious approach. We'll see how they both turn out this fall.








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The man who ousted Steve Jobs has launched two Android smartphones

In 1985, Steve Jobs was outsted from Apple, in part, by a man named John Sculley. A strong partnership had turned into a tumultuous relationship, ending with the Apple board pushing Jobs out of the company and Sculley taking over as CEO until 1993. He was then pushed out of the company himself.

Now the 74-year-old former Apple employee is launching two new Android smartphones aimed at the developing markets. Both phones, which come from Sculley's Obi Worldphone brand, are mid-rangers and were designed by Ammunition, a studio founded by Robert Brunner who worked at Apple as Jony Ive's predecessor.

Of the two handsets, the SF1 is the flagship, featuring a 5-inch 1080p display and including a 64-bit Snapdragon 615 processor. It's also got a 13 MP camera that takes two shots, one with flash and one without, to give a better image.

The second phone is called the SJ1.5 and has a lower-red 720p 5-inch display and includes a MediaTek 1.3 GHz quad-core processor.

Obi

Listing off these specs is all well and good, but you probably won't be buying either handset. The phones will launch in October but will be targeting emerging markets.

Is Sculley right to bet on a new smartphone business? He certainly has a history of investing in successful business and betting on good ideas.

Though his prediction that the Soviet Union would land a person on Mars by 2007 didn't pay off. He did vaguely predict the birth of Siri though as part of his "Knowledge Navigator" concept, which appeared in his 1987 book Odyssey.










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