5 review(s) | Add your review
Lenovo Z6 Pro 5G Android smartphone. Announced Jun 2019. Features 6.39″ Super AMOLED display, Snapdragon 855 chipset,
.00 SAR .00 SAR (.00)USD
Notify Price Drops
Quick Overview

The best price of Lenovo Z6 Pro 5G is .00 SAR at mobile57.com Store.

  • This Mobile runs on Android 9.0 (Pie); ZUI 11 powered with Octa-core (1x2.84 GHz Kryo 485 & 3x2.42 GHz Kryo 485 & 4x1.8 GHz Kryo 485) .
  • This Mobile has 48 MP, f/1.8, (wide), 1/2", 0.8µm, PDAF 8 MP, f/2.4, (telephoto), PDAF and has 32 MP, f/2.0, 0.8µm Secondary camera
  • This Mobile has 1080 x 2340 pixels, 19.5:9 ratio (~403 ppi density) inches display 6.39 inches, 100.2 cm2 (~85.3% screen-to-body ratio) Resolution .
  • This Mobile has 512 GB, 12 GB RAM or 256 GB, 8 GB RAM or 128 GB, 6/8 GB RAM of internal memory.
  • This Mobile has Non-removable Li-Po 4000 mAh battery
  • This Mobile has Dual SIM (Nano-SIM, dual stand-by) sim
  • Compare prices for Lenovo Z6 Pro 5G in Saudi Arabia:
Lowest price for Lenovo Z6 Pro 5G is .00 SAR

Sponsored

Store Details Price Visit store

Reviews

  • Be first to post review for this Item.

Write Your Own Review

Quality *
Price *
Note: HTML is not translated!

2019

Please enter the string as shown above:

No review this product.;

GENERAL
2G Network GSM 850 / 900 / 1800 / 1900 - SIM 1 & SIM 2
3G Network HSDPA 850 / 900 / 1900 / 2100
4G Network LTE band 1(2100), 3(1800), 5(850), 7(2600), 8(900), 20(800), 34(2000), 38(2600), 39(1900), 40(2300), 41(2500)
Sim Dual SIM (Nano-SIM, dual stand-by)
Announced 6/18/2019
Status 2019, June
BODY
Dimensions 157.5 x 74.6 x 8.7 mm (6.20 x 2.94 x 0.34 in)
Weight 185 g (6.53 oz)
DISPLAY
Display Size 1080 x 2340 pixels, 19.5:9 ratio (~403 ppi density)
SOUND
LoudSpeaker YES
3.5mm jack YES
MEMORY
CardSlot microSD, up to 1 TB (uses shared SIM slot)
Internal 512 GB, 12 GB RAM or 256 GB, 8 GB RAM or 128 GB, 6/8 GB RAM
DATA
WLAN Wi-Fi 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac, dual-band, Wi-Fi Direct, hotspot
Blue Tooth 5.0, A2DP, EDR, LE, aptX HD
NFC YES
USB 2.0, Type-C 1.0 reversible connector, USB On-The-Go
CAMERA
Camera Primary 48 MP, f/1.8, (wide), 1/2", 0.8µm, PDAF 8 MP, f/2.4, (telephoto), PDAF
Camera Features Dual-LED flash, panorama, HDR
CameraVideo 2160p@30fps, 1080p@120fps, gyro-EIS
CameraSecondary 32 MP, f/2.0, 0.8µm
FEATURES
OS Android 9.0 (Pie); ZUI 11
CPU Octa-core (1x2.84 GHz Kryo 485 & 3x2.42 GHz Kryo 485 & 4x1.8 GHz Kryo 485)
Sensors Fingerprint (under display), accelerometer, gyro, proximity, compass
Radio No
GPS Yes, with A-GPS, GLONASS, BDS
Colors Red
BATTERY
Battery Non-removable Li-Po 4000 mAh battery
MISC

Review: UPDATED: Moto X

Introduction, display and design

Update: Moto X continues to be one of the most stylish Android phones in 2015 and looks even better with Android Lollipop. Our review reflects that.

The Moto X name didn't changed in 2014, but rest assured, this updated Android smartphone packs enough new specs to deserve its own Moto X+1 or Moto X2 title.

With a larger screen, a better but not perfect camera, surprisingly useful first-party apps and, of course deeper customization, the original Moto Maker returns with a competitive price.

It's just $99 on-contract and on sale for as little as $1, or $499 (£419.99, AU$534). Don't let Motorola's low ball price fool you either. Like its low-key name, the Moto X 2014 has a deceptive asking price.

Motorola's flagship phone is slightly bigger in every sense, enough to make it one of the best Android premium phones next to the more expensive Samsung Galaxy S6 and HTC One M9. Though not groundbreaking like the curved Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge or LG G Flex 2, it's still one of the most stylish phones in 2015, enough to be part of our best phones list.

Moto X 2014 review

Availability and price

The Moto X 2nd generation launched on September 16, 2014, but that was the AT&T release date in the US. It came out for Verizon on September 26. Both carriers sold the 16GB phone on-contract for $100 and 32GB version for $150.

On sale, it was reduced to $1 during the holidays by some retailers, and Motorola eventually followed suit on its Moto Maker website in December. The unlocked price begins at $399.

In the UK, the new Moto X GSM unlocked edition became available at the end of September for £420 through Motorola's official website. Bumping the internal storage from 16GB to 32GB takes it to £460.

Wood and leather adds to the price. Moto X 2014 with a premium back costs $425 and £439.99 for the 16GB version and $175 and £479.99 for the 32GB edition, based on the original pricing.

Android 5.0 Lollipop premiered with the Motorola-made Nexus 6 and has arrived soon after on Moto X, at least from some carriers. Both the unlocked version and Verizon variant benefitted from the upgrade right away, while AT&T customers with Moto X 2nd generation had to wait several months. The same may happen with Android 5.1 in the offing.

Nexus 6, by comparison, has the Android Lollipop from the get-go, a larger 6-inch screen, a camera with optical image stabilization, dual front-facing speakers and a bigger battery. But it's also much more expensive at $650 (£499) for the 32GB base model and it loses that one-handed appeal.

Display

There's more to the Moto X 2014 now that the display literally measures up to its competition. It's 5.2 inches, the same size as the new Sony Xperia Z3 and a hair larger than the 5.1-inch Galaxy S5.

That's up half an inch from last year's 4.7-inch Moto X, a size that Motorola left to the likes of Apple and its, by comparison, pint-sized iPhone 6 display.

With a little reach and large enough fingers, the new Moto X is still a one-handed phone that almost ventures into two-handed territory. Yet it doesn't compromise much on the display when compared to a phablet.

Moto X 2014 review

It's again protected by Corning Gorilla Glass with the same AMOLED technology behind it, but the 1080p Full HD resolution makes for a much crisper screen with 423 pixels per inch. You won't want to go back to the original's 720p and 316 ppi display specs, that's for sure.

This sharper display is put to the test as soon as the new Moto X is booted up thanks to the bright and colorful default wallpapers that Motorola included with the handset. It really sets the tone for this premium smartphone experience, especially next to the still 720p Moto G 2014.

Moto X 2014 review

It stands bezel-to-bezel with the Samsung Galaxy S5 in this regard, though it lacks the Super AMOLED display. In a few cases, we found the Moto X screen harder to read outdoors. But keep in mind that Motorola has made its smartphone much cheaper than anything in its class.

The Moto X 2014 makes up for its direct sunlight shortcomings with a better way to conserve battery life by default. The return of the extremely efficient Motorola Active Display means that waving your hand over the phone or taking it out of your pocket brings up the current time and simple notification icons in white. The rest of the screen remains off. The popular, always-on microphone is here as well, giving you a way to cut to the chase with voice commands.

Moto X 2014 review

Tapping an Active Display icon reveals more information about the notification, like the gist of your latest emails or Hangout messages. It's a great use of AMOLED's ability to selectively light up individual pixels and it sure beats an ambiguous blinking status light on a phone.

Design

An all-new aluminum metal frame means that Moto X 2nd generation is stronger than its predecessor, not just bigger than before. Plastic is no longer binding together Motorola's flagship device. It's closer to the build material of the iPhone 5S, sturdier than the pliable iPhone 6 Plus and, most importantly, doesn't feel as cheap as the metal-looking polycarbonate Samsung Galaxy S5.

What's surprising is that despite the Moto X's naturally larger size care of the 5.2-inch display, Motorola once again used tricks to minimize the overall dimensions, and it worked in its favor. For example, there's very little bezel around the edges and the soft buttons are on-screen, as opposed to the capacitive buttons used by Samsung devices.

Moto X 2014 review

This makes the Moto X 2014 roughly the same size as the Galaxy S5 and, remarkably, even the iPhone 6. Its official measurements are 2.9 in (72.4 mm) x 5.5 in (140.8 mm) with a sloped 0.2 in (3.8 mm) to 0.4 in (9.9 mm) curve.

The S5's width and height are 2.9 in (72.5 mm) x 5.5 in (142 mm) with a narrower overall depth of 0.3 in (8.1 mm). iPhone 6 is nearly as big: 2.64 in (67.0 mm) x 5.44 in (138.1 mm) x 0.27 in (6.9 mm). As much as I appreciate the iPhone's home button and Touch ID, it has half an inch less screen real estate to show for its almost-as-tall dimensions.

Moto X 2014 review

Moto X 2014 reviewMoto X's premium frame thins out along the corners, but forms a fairly thick bow shape at the center for a curved back. This leaves plenty of room for a top-center 3.5mm headphone jack, an adjacent nano-SIM card slot and bottom-placed micro USB port. Along the thinned-out sides, there's just enough depth for a volume rocker that's smooth and power button that's accented with ridges. This makes it easier to tell the two stainless steel buttons apart in your pocket.

Moto Maker returns with additional customizations to match the now-premium Moto X with even more personalization. Leather, for example, is now among the choices that can back your phone in one of four colors. It joins last year's four wood options and 17 plastic colors. Black or white fronts and 10 accent colors for the front-facing speaker grills and rear Motorola logo dimple round out the most pressing Moto Maker decisions.

Moto X 2014 review

Cradling the Moto X backed in soft leather is a delight, but it's also the most delicate material within Moto Maker. Yes, the Moto 360 smartwatch uses the same genuine leather sourced from Horween Leather Company, but the supple material bruised more easily in our pockets than on our wrists. That's what's great about Moto Maker, though. It's filled with more options than your standard one-size-fits-all smartphone in case that doesn't work for you.

Moto X weighs in at 144 grams vs last year's 139 grams. Considering the aluminum metal frame and 5.2-inch screen, that's a worthy trade-off. Of course, there are beefier specs too.

Specs, performance and interface

Moto X 2014's specs, like its larger display size, complement the fact that it's no longer the runt of the Android litter. Its Qualcomm Snapdragon 801 processor is identical to the 2.5GHz quad-core chip that's found at the heart of the LTE-equipped Galaxy S5.

Moto X 2014 review

Motorola also answers Samsung's graphics performance with the same Adreno 330 GPU at 578 MHz and its memory with a healthy 2GB of RAM. The new Moto X isn't an also-ran when it comes to the most important specs. It's snappy performance backs this up even when all of our favorite apps, photos and video are clogging the internal storage.

There's a caveat: you can only fill up the Moto X so much because you won't find a micro SD card slot anywhere. Expandable storage isn't a part of the Moto X like it is on the Moto G 2014 and the earlier Moto G 4G model. You'll have to contend with the 16GB and Moto Maker-exclusive 32GB internal configurations.

Moto X 2014 review

Also missing is any sort of fingerprint sensor, heart rate monitor (not that you really need that) and waterproof seal. It doesn't measure up to the IP67 rating of many Android smartphones, so it's not water resistant up to 30 meters for an hour. Instead, it's just "splashproof." It's more than the leather back that's delicate in wet conditions.

Moto X did get the speakers right where others often fail. Its front-facing bottom grill projected music the right way - forward - not down at the ground, and its four microphones for voice calls and noise canceling reduced background noise to appropriate levels in all our test calls.

Interface and apps

Google may have sold Motorola to Lenovo, but the company is still dedicated to providing a pure Android experience that helps its phone contrast with devices from Samsung and HTC. You won't find TouchWiz or Sense changing the experience with a wonky overlay.

Moto X 2014 review

Moto X's Android KitKat 4.4 interface is much the same as last year save for the Google Now Launcher, a few fresh Motorola-branded apps and some carrier-loaded bloatware depending on your provider. Once again, the aforementioned Moto Display shows up when the display is off, providing a discreet and battery-saving method of peeking at notification icons.

Moto Assist takes driving seriously by reading text messages aloud while you're on the road. It also knows when to keep quiet without disruptive noises during meetings or when you're ready for bed. The next day, it wakes up when you wake up, according to your schedule.

Moto X review of apps for Verizon and ATT

Moto Actions takes advantage of the Moto X's IR emitters that resemble the sensor-spotted Amazon Fire Phone. The built-in app recognizes hand motions from all directions to turn on the Moto Active Display, silence calls and a snooze alarms with a simple wave. Just hop out of the shower and want to know the time? Look no further than Moto Actions. That's really convenient for a phone that's only splashproof.

Moto Voice builds upon Google Now by letting you change the always-listening voice prompt. Instead of the "Okay Google Now" command that seemed futuristic in 2013, the new Moto X lets you use custom phrases - everything from "You there Moto X?" to "Wake up buddy!" were among the Motorola-suggested examples. But I preferred the Motorola staffer / X-Men fan who used the prompt, "Okay Professor X" to get things started. And, again, unlike Siri, there's no need to hold down a button or have the phone plugged in to get the attention of Moto Voice.

Moto X 2014 review apps

Outside of the main Moto suite is Connect, a way to bridge the messaging gap between your Moto X smartphone and computer. It delivers text messages to a Chrome browser extension, though not as reliably as third-party apps like MightyText. I'm still hoping that Google one day brings SMS to Hangouts on a PC. Apple aced this with iMessages among its device owners two years ago and is further building upon it (by relaying all texts) with Mac OS X Yosemite and iOS 8. Connect is hopefully a stopover to something broader from Google.

Everything else about Motorola's Android KitKat 4.4 setup is untouched next to the Nexus 5, and for the most part, this pure interface is really appealing. It does mean that Google's quick settings for brightness, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth are buried behind one and two extra steps compared to what Samsung's pull-down menu. I really hate having to adjust the brightness outside with an swipe down, a poke at the left quick settings button, a stab in the dark at the brightness grid label and a feel for the brightness slider. Even with this, pure Android a lighter and cleaner alternative in all other cases.

Camera

Moto X 2014 can't pull off "premium" without a vastly improved camera considering last year's middling snapper. Motorola bumps the specs to 13 megapixels, up from the 10-megapixel rear camera that proved extremely inconsistent 12 months ago.

Moto X 2014 review

With a 13MP sensor that's identical to many of today's Android smartphones, the new Moto X took much sharper pictures than its predecessor. It also put the autofocus in the right place more times than not. That's not to say that its performance was flawless or as responsive as the speedier LG G3, but I walked away with higher-resolution photos and subjects in focus without the need to plead for retakes. It's a step in the right direction for Motorola.

Moto X 2014 review

The default camera app is simple and straightforward like last year, offering a tap-to-snap touchscreen shutter button, Auto HDR and Panorama. The controls are hidden to the left, while swiping right explores the gallery. What's interesting here is that Motorola's software tries to pick out the best pictures via its Highlight Reel functionality. It's not always perfect, but it does weed out blurry shots and handily group images for a quick comparison.

Moto X 2014 review

Keep in mind that Moto X's stripped-down manual focus and exposure options may make you leap for third-party alternatives in the Google Play Store, but Motorola's camera app is the only one that opens with two twists of a the wrist. Even if you don't use the default app all of the time, this shortcut makes for easy to capture photos in a minimal amount of time.

Moto X 2014 review

The 13-megapixel camera is accompanied by a unique-sounding ring flash, which essentially means the lens is flanked by two LED flash bulbs. The right and left lights do an admirable job brightening up subjects to balance shots, but approaching subjects too closely still results in overblown pictures.

Moto X 2014 review

When the Moto X gets things right colors temperature are oversaturated and pushed to the extreme on the equally saturated AMOLED. It's vibrate-looking, though not true to life in all cases. Selfies are best shot with the front-facing camera that's 2 megapixels and doesn't have a flash even if you want one.

Moto X 2014 review

Both cameras can shoot 1080p HD video, but only the rear-facing camera is capable of slow motion video at 120fps and Ultra HD video quality at 30fps. The pixels extend to 2160p, which means Motorola is now welcomed into the 4K smartphone capture club. Whether or not you really want to use up your limited internal storage for such video files is up to you.

Camera samples

Moto X 2014 review

Moto X 2014 review

Moto X 2014 review

Moto X 2014 review

Moto X 2014 review

Moto X 2014 review

Moto X 2014 review

Moto X 2014 review

Moto X 2014 review

Moto X 2014 review

Moto X 2014 review

Moto X 2014 review

Moto X 2014 review

Moto X 2014 review

Moto X 2014 review

Battery life

The new Moto X has a 2300 mAh battery backing up its larger screen, which is bigger than the 2200mAh battery found in last year's model. That seems better on paper until you realize that the 5.2-inch screen requires more power throughout the day. Throughout our testing the new Moto X lasted us 24 hours with mixed use.

That's enough to plug it in at night without fail, but not as long-lasting as something like the Galaxy S5 with a 2800mAh battery. Motorola does benefit from the AMOLED Active Display because checking the time and notifications doesn't light up the entire screen. It also doesn't accidentally light up in this mode when face down or in a pocket.

Moto X 2014 review

The company's Moto 360 smartwatch has a significantly shorter battery life of less than a day and it's yet another thing to charge. However, also shored up our notification-checking addiction on the Moto X 2014 and ultimately helped the battery last even longer than 24 hours some days.

When battery life is critical, though, it's Samsung that swoops in with its Ultra Power Saving mode. It can be a real battery life-saver. Motorola's 10% is the same as its 90%. You also won't find a backward compatible micro USB 3.0 connection on the Moto X for faster charging and transfers, as seen in the Note 3 and S5.

Moto X 2014 review

Motorola does sell a Turbo Charger that can add an impressive eight hours of battery life in just 15 minutes thanks to Qualcomm Quick Charge 2.0 technology. Its ideal for juicing up during work breaks in the day and layovers at the airport, but it's not something you'll get out of the box.

It costs $35 (about £21, AU$40) through Motorola's Moto Maker store, unlike the Nexus 6 and Droid Turbo that come with the larger power brick.

Verdict

Moto X 2014's display size jumped half an inch, but the overall quality leapt a full foot from its also-ran origins. That's not to say that it was a terrible mid-range device the first time around. Motorola has just updated the design and specs enough to make it a high-end contender in 12 short months.

It takes on the "premium" label without sacrificing the low price point in most regions. In fact, the US price is actually a lot cheaper: $99 on contract, making it half the price of its leading competitors. SIM-free it's still a deal: $499 (£419.99, AU$534).

Moto X 2014 review

We liked

The 5.2-inch display gives us more screen real estate without verging on phablet territory. It's still a one-handed device for people with large enough fingers and coupled with the AMOLED Moto Active Display that we wish all smartphone manufacturers would blatantly copy already.

A metal frame makes it feel as good as the screen looks, while Moto Maker combinations now total in the thousands. The pure Android OS is thankfully only supplemented by Motorola's useful apps and the price makes it Android's hidden treasure. X truely does mark the spot.

Moto X 2014 review

We disliked

It's premium, but it's not without pitfalls. Moto X 2014 doesn't have a micro SD card slot, so you're either stuck with 16GB or 32GB of internal storage. You can also forget about taking it in any sort of water. It's not IP67 waterproof like many other Androids so hold onto it tight.

Wait, don't hold onto it too tightly. That all-new premium leather back cost more, but bruised on us rather easily. The 13-megapixel rear camera takes better photos than before - not much of an accomplishment. We're still not convinced it'll ever take the shot we want every time.

New Moto X 2014 review

Final Verdict

Don't think that just because the Moto X 2014 name didn't get much of a change that the phone is just a basic specs bump. Motorola's new flagship smartphone proves that the reinvented company is listening to customer feedback with a bigger screen and aluminum metal frame, all for a price that's better than its competition. It only half-listened the requests for a superior camera and didn't pay attention to pleas for a micro SD slot.

The good news is that Motorola continuing with its popular Moto Maker customization policies. That means personalized backs including new soft leather and trim accents on the front and around the camera lense. And yet the firm doesn't tinker with the pure Android experience set forth by Google. The specs are more robust while the software stays minimal, the opposite of other Android phones out there. That's just the way Motorola rolls, and we rather enjoy it.

First reviewed: September 2014








Updated: 10 best mobile phones in the world today

Number 10: Nexus 6

Here at TechRadar, we check out every phone under the sun, putting the ones that matter through our rigorously vigorous testing process to create our indepth mobile phone reviews.

However, with so many to choose from, we've spent hours whittling them down to a top ten, taking into account the power, specs, design and most importantly: value for money, although we'll always point you in the direction of the latest handsets - after all, nobody wants to be carting around a phone that doesn't get any updates in a year's time, right?

So whether it's one of the many slick Android handsets, the latest iPhone or one from a range of other cool operating systems, we've extensively tested them all so you don't have to!

Here are our rankings for the best smartphones around, currently available in Australia.

Nexus 6

10. Nexus 6

Google's best ever phone is also its biggest ever

OS: Android 5 | Screen size: 5.96-inch | Resolution: 2560 x 1440 | Memory: 3GB | Storage: 32GB/64GB | Battery: 3,220mAh | Rear camera: 13MP | Front camera: 2MP

Google's latest Nexus is a phone that moves away from the usual 'super cheap superphone' and into phablet territory with its latest offering. The good news is the screen is also supercharged: massive at 6 inches, it's also got a stunning QHD resolution.

You'll always be getting the latest updates to Google's Android OS with this one, and while it's certainly something you'd have to use two handed (make sure you're fine with that before buying, as it's put a lot of people off that we've shown it too) it's tremendous display, premium specs and great use of Android 5.0 Lollipop make one of the best phablets to date.

It's not cheap, but it's the best Nexus ever made. And, when you think about it, you're not going to need to hold onto your money, as you'll require both hands to grab onto this two-handed monster.

Number 9: Sony Xperia Z3

Sony Xperia Z3

9. Sony Xperia Z3

A solid phone with a good screen and excellent battery life

OS: Android 5 | Screen size: 5.15-inch | Resolution: 1920 x 1080 | Memory: 3GB | Storage: 16GB/32GB | Battery: 3,100mAh | Rear camera: 20.7MP | Front camera: 2.2MP

The Xperia Z3 is a phone that offers the best of Sony with some really polished tweaks thrown in for good measure. The screen is one of the brightest around and really benefits from Bravia technology, and the longer battery life embarrasses a number of other big smartphones around at the moment.

We do expect more from the camera, and the black bezels above and below the display ruin the aesthetic somewhat, but the ability to Remote Play your PS4 more than makes up for it - it's a really cool feature and means you can keep gaming while someone else is hogging the TV.

The Z3 is a brilliant phone with a few rough edges - but Sony's also great at bringing the cost of its handsets down, so this represents really good value for money for a flagship.

Number 8: iPhone 6 Plus

iPhone 6 Plus

8. iPhone 6 Plus

Apple's first bigscreen phone is a stunner

OS: iOS 8 | Screen size: 5.5-inch | Resolution: 1920 x 1080 | Memory: 1GB |Storage:16GB/64GB/128GB | Battery: 2,915mAh | Rear camera: 8MP | Front camera: 1.2MP

Put simply, this is the bigger version of the smaller iPhone 6. But Apple's done a bit more with its first phablet, with some increased specs to offset that higher price.

The screen is Full HD and really packs some stunning colour reproduction. The camera on the back host optical image stabilisation, so pictures looks sharp and also brighter, thanks to more light being let in.

The iPhone 6 Plus also has something that's eluded iPhone fans for years: a really good battery, with Apple using that extra space to cram in a few more mAh units.

It's one of the most expensive phones around, and is bettered on spec by a few others - but if you're an Apple fan looking for a 'bigger' experience, this is the phone for you.

Number 7: Samsung Galaxy Note 4

Samsung Galaxy Note 4

7. Samsung Galaxy Note 4

Samsung's latest phablet is the best bigscreen phone available

OS: Android 5 | Screen size: 5.7-inch | Resolution: 2560 x 1440 | Memory: 3GB | Storage: 32GB |Battery: removable 3,220mAh | Rear camera: 16MP | Front camera: 3.7MP

Samsung created the phablet category and continues to lead it, cramming in so much technology into the Note 4 while bringing the S Pen stylus that many love to use.

The main thing we love is the screen though: Super AMOLED technology combined with QHD resolution means a pin sharp display, and one that we just can't take our eyes off, with the bigger size actually working to show off the extra pixels.

It's not cheap, and the interface isn't as clean and clear as on the Samsung Galaxy S6 range, but that could all change soon - in which case, this is one of the most fully featured phones that rewards those willing the pay the premium and put the time in to learn its powers.

Number 6: Sony Xperia Z3 Compact

Sony Xperia Z3 Compact

6. Sony Xperia Z3 Compact

A small Android phone packed with big features

OS: Android 5 | Screen size: 4.6-inch | Resolution: 1280 x 720 | Memory: 2GB | Storage: 16GB |Battery: 2,600mAh | Rear camera: 20.7MP | Front camera: 2.2MP

Less powerful with a lower-res screen than its bigger brother, the Z3 Compact still uses most of the high-end specs, fuses them with things like Remote Play and the 20.7MP camera, and does it all at a really low cost for a phone of this power.

The 4.7-inch display makes this one of the best phones to hold and use in day to day life, and it's also got a brilliantly long-lasting battery too, so if you're not a fan of the gargantuan models on show, there's a lot to love with Sony's mini flagship.

The best of Sony in a smartphone - if that's what you're after, this is the phone to go for. It's the ergonomics and the price that impress, and while it's not quite got the spec sheet of the main Z3, it feels a lot more polished.

Number 5: LG G3

LG G3

5. LG G3

A superb flagship phone for an excellent price

OS: Android 5 | Screen size: 5.5-inch | Resolution: 2560 x 1440 | Memory: 2GB/3GB |Storage:16GB/32GB | Battery: removable 3,000mAh | Rear camera: 13MP | Front camera:2.1MP

The LG G3's main selling points are simple: price and an ultra clear screen. It's got a lot of other technology in there to attract you too, but it's those two elements that show it off so well, as well as fan favourite features like a removable battery and memory card slot.

LG has always offered a premium experience for a lower price than its rivals, and with a QHD screen it's got four times the pixels of some phones on this list, and it also comes with a number of other enhancements too - although with those extra pixels packed in, the display is a bit darker than others on the market.

Laser-based auto-focus? Check. Improved design? Check. Overhauled and simplified UI? Double check. It's a little big for some hands, thanks to the 5.5-inch display, and the camera isn't up to scratch - but for the price it's easy to forgive those elements when there's so much else to love in this handset.

Number 4: Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge

Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge

4. Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge

Curving into the future with impressive specs

OS: Android 5 | Screen size: 5.1-inch | Resolution: 1440 x 2560 | Memory: 3GB |Storage:32GB/64GB/128GB | Battery: 2560mAh | Rear camera: 16MP | Front camera: 5MP

The Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge has all the power and features of the table-topping S6, but does it with a little extra too, thanks to the curved edges on each side.

They're pretty much aesthetics, as they don't add a huge amount of functionality, but if you're going on looks alone, the S6 Edge has them in spades.

The price is a lot higher though, which is why it doesn't join its twin (non-identical) brother at the top of the chart, but if you're after a phone that's wildly different from anything else with a great feature set and tip-top camera, this is your choice.

Number 3: HTC One M9

HTC One M9

3. HTC One M9

Not quite up the 5 star standard, but HTC still has the most beautiful phone around

OS: Android 5 | Screen size: 5-inch | Resolution: 1920x1080 | Memory: 3GB |Storage: 32GB | Battery:2840mAh | Rear camera: 20.7MP | Front camera: 4MP

HTC's been used to living at the top of our charts for the last couple of years, and while it's not quite managed it in 2015, it's still a phone with the best build quality out there.

None of the old favourites are missing, so BoomSound enhancement still really turbocharges the audio and the Sense overlay remains one of our favourites, thanks to being sophisticated and really powerful.

The camera has been boosted to 20.7MP, although doesn't have the impressive snapping power of some of the other phones on the market, and the design language still means this is one of our favourite phones to stick in the pocket.

It's a touch more expensive than before, and doesn't take a huge leap forward from last year's model - but then again, that was nearly perfect, so where was HTC to go?

Number 2: iPhone 6

iPhone 6

2. iPhone 6

Bigger, better, sleeker and faster than the iPhone 5S

OS: iOS 8 | Screen size: 4.7-inch | Resolution: 1334 x 750 | Memory: 1GB |Storage:16GB/64GB/128GB | Battery: 1,810mAh | Rear camera: 8MP | Front camera: 1.2MP

The iPhone 6 - a real step forward for Apple and a phone that's a real joy to use, hold and feel. It's got all the same ingredients that make iPhones special: while it doesn't excel in any given part of the smartphone recipe, it just works, promoting simplicity over fiddly menus..

The camera has a lower megapixel count than others, but it's fast, bright and easy to use. The screen is too low-res compared to the phones around it, but pops and fizzes with colour and brightness. And that design - we have to keep coming back to it as it feels beautiful in the hand.

The sticking point is it's still one of the most expensive phones on the market, and spec-fiends will note it's not quite got the technology inside to truly back up the cost.

But don't let that put you off: if you're in the market for a handset from Apple, or just been tempted by one in the past: buy the iPhone 6. It's excellent, a pure joy to use.

Number 1: Samsung Galaxy S6

Galaxy S6

1. Samsung Galaxy S6

A brilliant phone that shows Samsung still has what it takes

OS: Android 5 | Screen size: 5.1-inch | Resolution: 1440 x 2560 | Memory: 3GB |Storage:32GB/64GB/128GB | Battery: 2550mAh | Rear camera: 16MP | Front camera: 5MP

While last year's Galaxy S5 was nothing special, this year Samsung's started from the ground up to make a truly wonderful smartphone.

The camera is superb, the audio and video quality brilliant and the QHD display crammed into the 5.1-inch screen is the sharpest on the market - although it does suck down the battery rather a lot.

The design is finally something we're pleased to hold in our hand, rather than the plastic cheapness of last year, and the refined TouchWiz overlay is a lot nicer to use.

It's pretty expensive mind, so make sure you're after a truly A-grade experience before buying as you'll be paying handsomely for it - but if you do take the plunge, you've got the best phone on the market.

You might also like...

If a phone isn't in the top 10 best phones in the world list, that doesn't mean it's not worth giving two hoots about.

Here's a few handsets you might want to think about should none of the above tickle your fancy... although you're clearly VERY hard to please:

HTC One M8

HTC One M8

A stunning phone with very few flaws

OS: Android | Screen size: 5-inch | Resolution: 1920 x 1080 | RAM: 2GB | Storage: 16GB/32GB |Battery: 2,600mAh | Rear camera: 4MP dual | Front camera: 5MP

The HTC One M8 has tumbled dramatically out of the top 10 after holding onto top spot for the best part of a year, so why the demise? Well it's now pretty old compared to the handsets making up the top ten, and there's a new kid on the block in the shape of the One M9.

It's still the same perfectly design handset though, with impressive BoomSound speakers and the short-live, yet innovative Duo Camera on the year - but the One M9 is almost identical, and just a bit better all round.

There's been a small price drop too since the arrival of the One M9, and you certainly won't be getting a poor phone if you choose to pick it up - but for just a bit more you can have its up to date successor. Your call.

Samsung Galaxy s5

Samsung Galaxy S5

A year old, but still very capable

OS: Android | Screen size: 5.1-inch | Resolution: 1920 x 1080 | RAM: 2GB | Storage: 16GB/32GB |Battery: 2,800mAh | Rear camera: 16MP | Front camera: 2MP

If Samsung's latest duo of flagship devices (the Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge) are too rich for your wallet then you can always consider last year's Galaxy S5.

Sure it doesn't have the same premium design as the current generation, but the plastic body means it's dust and water resistant as well as giving you a removable battery and microSD slot - all things not available on the S6 range.

The drop in price also makes the Galaxy S5 more attractive and it's stuffed full of tech and sports a fantastic screen to ensure you still have an enjoyable mobile experience.

Nokia Lumia 930

Nokia Lumia 930

Hey Nokia, (now Microsoft), nice flagship phone!

OS: Windows Phone | Screen size: 5-inch | Resolution: 1920 x 1080 | RAM: 2GB | Storage: 32GB |Battery: 2,420mAh | Rear camera: 20MP | Front camera: 1.2MP

The Lumia 930 does lack compared to the competition, but only in a couple of areas. Windows Phone is still a sub-par operating system for most people, thanks to the poorer apps and lower amount of control. But then again, for a lot of people the improved Office functionality and simple interface is a boon.

It's strong in both design and power, although a little last-gen on the latter element, and coupled with a very capable camera, is a phone that's easy to recommend to those looking for something different.

Windows Phone aside, there's a great deal on show here to make this a top-rated smartphone. The build quality is excellent and iconic, and the camera is powerful and results in mostly great snaps. We like that 32GB is on offer as the base model, and wireless charging built in is perfect.

OnePlus One

OnePlus One

A flagship phone for half the cost

OS: Android | Screen size: 5.5-inch | Resolution: 1920 x 1080 | RAM: 3GB | Storage: 16GB/64GB |Battery: 3,100mAh | Rear camera: 13MP | Front camera: 5MP

If you fancy trying something a bit different then Chinese firm OnePlus has a rather enticing proposition. It's first flagship smartphone (and only device to date), the OnePlus One, as the same feature set as 2014's flagships, but at a fraction of the cost.

You can pick up the One SIM-free from just £229, which is a steal when you consider it packs a 5.5-inch full HD display, Snapdragon 800 processor, 2GB of RAM and a 13MP rear facing camera.

It runs the community backed CyanogenMod version of Android which comes with lots of handy little extras. The design is hardly inspiring and the lack of a microSD slot may put some off, but for the price you can't really go wrong

Apple iPhone 5S

iPhone 5S

Perfect for fans of the smaller screen size

OS: iOS | Screen size: 4-inch | Resolution: 1136 x 640 | RAM: 1GB | Storage: 16GB/32GB/64GB |Battery: 1,560mAh | Rear camera: 8MP | Front camera: 1.2MP

Remember this? After the furore with the iPhone 6, it's easy to forget that the Apple iPhone 5S is still alive and kicking.

It's still a bit expensive, but that said it's sucked down the iOS 8 software pretty well, and is still pushing on as a decent option for a slightly cheaper iPhone, especially if you like the smaller sized screen.

Plus, you can use it with the Apple Watch and pay for things on the go using the cunningly named Apple Pay - although for some reason Touch ID won't be enabled to work online, where it will be for the iPad Air 2 and friends.

BlackBerry Classic

BlackBerry Classic

Physical keyboards FTW, right?

OS: BlackBerry 10 | Screen size: 3.5-inch | Resolution: 720 x 720 | RAM: 2GB | Storage: 16GB |Battery: 2,515mAh | Rear camera: 8MP | Front camera: 2MP

Come again? BlackBerry is still going? Well yes it is, and in the past year it's launched both the Passportand the Classic.

They certainly won't be to many people's taste, but those unable to drag themselves away from a physical keyboard on their phone have the Classic to fall back on.

It takes the best bits of design from the firm's much loved Bold series and brings them into the 21st Century with the BB10 operating system and improved specs. Great for those always emailing and messaging on the go, just don't try and play games or watch movies on its 4:3 display.








UPDATED: All 38 Apple Watch designs: Every band, case and face so far

Apple Watch: watch cases and bands

Apple Watch features

This week was the Apple Watch launch day, but you can't try on the iPhone-compatible wearable yet since we're a month away from pre-orders and two weeks further from its official release date.

That's a problem for anxious early adopters who want it now. The April 24-bound smartwatch comes in a variety of colors and styles, way more than the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus.

In fact, there are 38 different Apple Watch choices (up from the original 34) and nine default watch faces with millions of customizations, according to Apple.

Here's every Apple Watch face, band and case announced so far, giving you extra time to decide which "iWatch" should be your watch before waiting in line.

Cases: Apple Watch vs Sport vs Watch Edition

YouTube : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zr72v7Z7m4Y

All Apple Watches boast the same rectangular design with rounded off corners, but they're divided up into three different case "collections" based on build materials.

Starting at $349 (£299) and costing as much as $17,000 (£13,500, AU$24,000), the names Watch, Watch Sport and Watch Edition, don't tell us a whole lot about those differences, so let's explain each watch case.

The regular Apple Watch

Apple Watch design and colors

Donning the "regular" Watch puts a highly polished stainless steel case on your wrist, one that comes in glossy metal colors of either space black or stainless steel.

Protecting the precious Retina display is sapphire crystal, which is the same glass that covers the Touch ID home button of newer iPhones.

Sapphire crystal is touted as the hardest transparent material on earth next to diamond. It'll stand up to dings every time your formerly-bare wrist forgets what it's like to wear a watch.

Watch Sport

Apple Watch design and colors

Sport is the the lightest of the three Apple Watch choices thanks to its anodized aluminum case that still manages to be 60% stronger than standard alloys.

It skips out of the expensive sapphire glass in favor of what Apple calls strengthened Ion-X or aluminosilicate glass. This further reduces the weight, making it fit for active lifestyles.

Sure, the iPhone-matching matte space gray and silver aluminum case appears less shiny vs the regular Watch, but Apple's 7000 Series aluminum and Ion-X glass makes it 30% lighter.

It's also the least expensive Apple Watch version at $349 (£299) for the 38mm size and 42mm for the $399 (£339) size.

Watch Edition

Apple Watch design and colors

Watch Edition will be the most expensive Apple Watch at $10,000 (£8,000) because of its 18-karat gold case. It may even be locked inside a safe within your local Apple Store.

It's been crafted by Apple's metallurgists to be twice as hard as standard gold, says the Cupertino company, and will come in two colors: yellow gold and rose gold.

Complementing those cases are color-matching bands made of leather or fluoroelastomer plastic.

Bands are the next step in deciding on the right Apple Watch.

Six different band styles, 18 colors

Apple Watch bands

Apple Watch is all about personalization with six band types and 18 colors, all of which are easily interchangeable thanks a unique slide-out locking mechanism.

Yes, it's a proprietary watch strap - did you expect anything less? - but it looks to be a whole lot easier to switch out compared to the irksome hidden pins of the Moto 360.

I'm okay with that. I want the sport band at the gym and the Milanese loop for a night on the town without the hassle of digging into the watch case with a pair of tweezers.

Link bracelet

Apple Watch bands

Apple Watch choices

Available with the regular Watch, the link bracelet is one of two stainless steel Apple Watch bands. This one matches the 316L stainless steel alloy of the case.

It has more than 100 components and the brushed metal links increase in width closer to the case. A custom butterfly closure folds neatly within the bracelet.

Best of all, you can add and remove links with a simple release button. No jeweler visits or special tools required for this stainless steel or space black-colored strap.

Milanese loop

Apple Watch bands

Apple Watch bands

One of the classiest-looking Apple Watch bands is the Milanese loop, a stainless steel mesh strap that loops from case to clasp.

Emphasizing that woven metal design, there's hardly a clasp. Its tiny magnetic end makes the strap infinitely adjustable and tucks behind the band for a seamless look on one's wrist.

An out-of-the box option with the regular Watch, the Milanese loop is truly one of a kind in that it only comes in a stainless steel color.

Modern buckle (leather strap)

Apple Watch bands

Apple Watch leather

A modern buckle adorns the bottom the first of three leather options among Apple Watches, complete with top-grain leather sourced from France.

The French tannery is said to have been established in 1803, but Apple puts a tech-savvy twist on the buckle. It's a two-piece magnetic clasp that only looks ordinary when together.

This leather option comes in black, soft pink, brown or midnight blue for the regular Watch and bright black, red or rose gray for the premium Watch Edition, all meant for the smaller 38mm watch size.

Classic buckle (leather strap)

Apple Watch design and colors

Apple Watch models

If the Apple Watch modern buckle is a normal-looking watch band with a magnetic twist, then the classic buckle is an ordinary-looking variant without one.

No tricks here. It's just a traditional and secure band that feeds through a stainless steel or an 18-karat gold loop and matches the watch case.

The classic buckle's leather is from the Netherlands and the color choices are as simple as can be: it comes in black for the regular Watch or either black or midnight blue for Watch Edition.

Leather loop

Apple Watch bands

Apple Watch design

This is the leather-equivalent of the all-metal Milanese loop because it tucks magnets into the soft, quilted leather Apple Watch band.

The more pronounced pebbled texture also stands out from the subtle finishes of the modern and classic buckle. Apple says its Venezia leather sources from Italy.

Apple Watch buyers who go with the leather loop band have four colors choices: black, stone, light brown and bright blue.

Sport band

Apple Watch bands

Apple Watch sport band

Despite its name, the sport band is an out-of-the-box option among all three "collections," not just the Apple Watch Sport.

The band is made of smooth fluoroelastomer, so it's resilient for all activities and fastens with a simple pin-and-tuck closure. Hopefully it's easier to buckle than the Fitbit Charge.

The sport band is available in the most colors on the Sport Watch: white, black, blue, green or pink. Regular Watch and Watch Edition buyers can choose between black or white.

Apple Watch sizes

Apple Watch sizes

Less exciting, but equally important is the choice of among Apple Watch sizes. There are two case heights: 38mm and 42mm.

This opens it up to smaller and larger wrists. The 38mm size is more compact, but having that little bit extra screen space by way of the 42mm option may go a long way.

It should be noted that a few bands appear to be exclusive to certain sizes: the modern buckle is limited to the 38mm option and leather loop the 42mm size, for example.

No right-handed and left-handed Apple Watch decisions need to be made at the Apple Store, thankfully. This smartwatch is ambidextrous because the screen can be flipped.

Apple Watch faces

Apple Watch analog watches

There are nine different default faces from Apple, according to its official website, and likely a lot more to come from third-party developers currently testing out WatchKit.

The great thing about smartwatch faces is that none of them are permanent, something we were fond of when testing out Android Wear smartwatches.

Mickey Mouse is my favorite because I never got a Mickey Mouse watch as a kid. But maybe that'll be reserved for Disneyland visits now that I'm an adult.

Analog watches like Chronograph, Color, Simple and Utility can be swapped in for a more professional look that rivals today's best smartwatch alternatives.

Customizable watch faces

Apple Watch designs

Digital watch faces all have something unique to offer. Motion adds a bit of animal-inspired movement in the background, solar lets you follow the sun's path based on your location and the time of day and astronomy lets you explore space and a rotatable 3D Earth.

Modular, the grid-like ninth watch face, really defines what Apple means when it talks about complications. Most faces can be alerted to include pressing information like stock quotes, weather reports or your next calendar event, according to the company.

Apple Watch wrap-up

Apple Watch

With two sizes for most band designs, six band types, 18 band colors and three cases with two colors each, there's a lot of choice going into this smartwatch purchase.

Apple Watch is launching with a lot of personalization, echoing a time when the Cupertino firm introduced variety among its iMac G3 computers and iPod successors.

Which case and band combination I get has ultimately been determined by the price and availability. For such a new product that's bound to be outdated in a few months to years, I'm leaning toward the cheaper Sport Edition when the Apple Watch release date rolls around.








Updated: Sony Xperia Z4 release date, news and rumors

Xperia Z4: release date, design and display

It might not seem that long ago since the Xperia Z3 was released, but with Sony's rapid release schedule for its flagship smartphones the rumour mill has already been working overtime.

We've started to hear plenty rumours about Sony's next flagship, including one report which reckons the Japanese firm will return to an annual launch of its top device, ditching the recent trend of every six months, though not until after the Z4 launches.

Updates: We may not have quite as long to wait for the Sony Xperia Z4 as we'd thought, but it still probably won't launch before June.

Cut to the chase

  • What is it? Sony's next flagship smartphone
  • When is it out? Sometime in the summer probably
  • What will it cost? A lot - this will be a high-end device

Sony Xperia Z4 release date

Early rumors suggested we'd see the Sony Xperia Z4 at MWC 2015, but that hasn't happened. So when will we see it? That's not entirely clear.

Some rumors suggest that Sony is moving from two flagships a year to just one and pushing the Sony Xperia Z4 back to the summer.

On the other hand Sony has already started rolling out its '4' product range with the Xperia Z4 Tablet and the Xperia M4 Aqua, so it would make sense to have a smartphone alongside them. Plus, speaking to TrustedReviews, Tim Harrison, Sony's Vice President of Global Communications and PR, claimed the company hasn't moved to a 12 month product cycle.

So maybe we won't have to wait too long after all. The Xperia Z4 Tablet isn't set to launch till June anyway, so that still gives Sony a few months to announce its next flagship and get it on the market at the same time.

What will it cost?

There's been no information on how much the Xperia Z4 will cost, however as it's a flagship smartphone (and a Sony one at that) we'd expect it to ship with a high price tag.

The Xperia Z3 launched at £549 ($630, AU$849) and we'd expect the Z4 to launch at around the same price.

Rumours have also suggested that Sony could be plotting two versions of its flagship smartphone. There would be a Z4 with a 1080 x 1920 full high definition screen, similar to the one found on the Xperia Z3. The second version would offer a much higher 1440 x 2560 (QHD) resolution.

These rumours claim that the 1080p version will cost less than the QHD version, though we'd take those claims with a pinch of salt.

Sony Xperia Z4 design

The Xperia Z3's attractive OmniBalance design was one of its strongest features, and it looks like Sony won't be straying too far from that template.

Xperia Z4 leak

According to a source that contacted Phone Arena, the Xperia Z4 will have thinner top and bottom bezels as well as more rounded corners as you can sort of see in the accompanying image.

You may not have to imagine what the Z4 may look like any more, after images apparently taken from the email account of the Sony CEO during the major Sony hack reveals early renders of the Xperia Z4.

Sony Xperia Z4 - LEAK

What can you expect then? Well a mirrored front and rear, the now-traditional oversized power/lock key on the right and three colour options - white, black and yellow. That's if the images are correct, of course.

Annotated images that were included in the leak show that the Xperia Z4 could come with a 1.2mm glass panel and resin bezel.

Sony Xperia Z4

Another recent rumour suggested that Sony could be releasing a Walkman edition of the Xperia Z4. This version would concentrate on music playing with hi-res audio codec support, two-day battery life and improved S-Force PRO front-facing speakers.

Releasing multiple versions of its upcoming flagship smartphone could be a risky move on Sony's part, but more choice might not be a bad thing for the consumer looking to buy a phone that focuses on their specific interest.

Sony Xperia Z4 screen

There's been a lot of conflicting reports on the Xperia Z4's screen. One area of contention is how large the screen will be.

Early rumours hinted that the screen would be 5.5-inches, a fair bit larger than the 5.2-inch display on the Xperia Z3.

Another rumour suggested that the screen will be slightly smaller at 5.4-inches, though still an upgrade over the Z3.

The latest rumours we've heard about the size of the Xperia Z4's screen claims that neither of those sizes is correct, and instead Sony will be sticking with a 5.2-inch display.

That has now been backed up with details from a new leak that suggests there will be a 5.2-inch screen with a Quad HD resolution of 1440 x 2560 pixels equaling 565ppi.

The other detail rumours seem to be conflicted on is regarding the resolution of the screen. Although some rumours claim that Sony is sticking with 1080p as the resolution, other rumours are suggesting it will get a substantial boost to QHD 1440 x 2560, the same as the LG G3.

Perhaps most interestingly we've also heard rumours that both these resolutions are correct, and that Sony will be release two different versions of the Xperia Z4.

Power, OS and Camera

Sony Xperia Z4 power

We could be in for something quite special with the Xperia Z4, as a benchmark result pegs it as having a Snapdragon 810 processor and 3GB of RAM.

Earlier claims include specs which largely line up with this. A 64-bit 2.8GHz octa-core Snapdragon 810 processor, 4GB of RAM, Adreno 430 GPU, 32GB of storage and a Exmor RS CMOS sensor have all been touted for the handset.

It will supposedly support Bluetooth 4.1 and LTE Cat.6 connectivity, leaving it equipped to handle LTE-A speeds.

We've seen other rumors that offer conflicting reports on the chip that will power the Xperia Z4 though. Some rumors suggest it will come with the Snapdragon 810 chipset, while others claim delays in the production of the processor have resulted in the Z4 coming with the slightly older Snapdragon 805.

Either way, both these processors offer an upgrade over the Snapdragon 801, which is found in the Xperia Z3.

The battery is pegged at 3420mAh, which is a slight boost over the 3100mAh Xperia Z3.

Sony Xperia Z4 operating system

We've heard relatively little about what operating system the Xperia Z4 will run, though it's a safe bet that it will be some form of Android with Sony's custom overlay.

As Sony is rolling out the update to the latest version of Google's mobile operating system, Android 5.0 Lollipop, from the beginning of February to the Xperia Z3, it's pretty likely that when the Xperia Z4 launches later in the year it will come with Android 5.0 Lollipop preinstalled.

Sony Xperia Z4 camera

The camera is said to have a 20.7MP resolution, just like the Xperia Z3, but with a new sensor capable of taking in more light along with an upgraded 4.8MP front-facing snapper.

The Xperia Z4's launch will apparently coincide with the launch of a new flagship mobile image sensor, the Exmor RS IMX230.

Sony Xperia Z4

If true, then there is a good chance that the Xperia Z4 will feature the IMX230 sensor. It comes with a 21 megapixel resolution (the same as the Xperia Z3), but with a number of new features as well.

Sony claims it is the industry's first CMOS image sensor built for smartphones that can track fast-moving subjects thanks to built-in image plane phase detection autofocus.

It will also support High Dynamic Range for high resolution still images and 4K video, and it all comes in a form factor that's more compact than its predecessor. Will Sony finally let you record for more than a nanosecond in 4K though? Surely the brand must have ironed out that wrinkle by now.

Other leaks suggest the Z4's camera will feature the IMX189AEG CMOS image sensor. This sensor will be able to record 2K video (2048 x 1080) at 16,000 frames per second, with 4K video (6144 x 2160) recording at 240 frames per second, much faster (and therefore smoother) than the Z3.

Xperia Z4: what we want to see

The Sony Xperia Z3 has only recently arrived on shop shelves but we're pretty sure we're very close to seeing the new handset, so over the last few months we've been making a wishlist of what we want to see.

4K video that actually works

Sony's been trumpeting its phones 4K video capabilities since the Xperia Z2, yet neither that nor the Xperia Z3 can actually record for more than around five minutes without heating up and shutting down the video.

Z3 camera

That's obviously a major problem and while it doesn't quite render the 4K feature redundant it does severely limit it. The fact that Sony has left it unfixed in the Xperia Z3 is perplexing, presumably there isn't an easy fix, but if longer videos were possible it could be a genuinely useful feature, whereas right now it's just kind of an embarrassment.

So hopefully it will be fixed for the Sony Xperia Z4. You never know, some people might even have 4K televisions by then too.

A QHD display

The Sony Xperia Z, Z1 and Z2 all had 1080p displays and that was fine as that was the best any smartphone had at the time and the screen size was at least being increased.

But then the Xperia Z3 also launched with a 1080p screen and that was slightly more disappointing, since the size remained the same and other than increased brightness there wasn't much of an upgrade, plus some other phones, such as the LG G3, have started including QHD displays.

We want the Xperia Z4 to wow us and a 1080p display for the fifth time in a row won't do that, so we're hoping its QHD.

Smaller bezels

Xperia Z3

The Sony Xperia Z3 looks great, but the bezels above and below the screen are off-puttingly large. Presumably there's a reason for their size, they're likely housing vital components required to make the phone actually work, but they're unsightly and we hope they're smaller next time around.

Improved low-light performance

For the most part the Xperia Z3 has a perfectly capable and even impressive camera, but its low-light performance could still use some work.

Sony made some strides with the Xperia Z3, improving it over the Z2, but seemingly more with software than hardware as its low-light photos tend to come out over-processed, leaving it trailing behind the likes of the iPhone 6 and the HTC One M8 in darker scenes.

Clearly Sony is aware of the problem given that it made some improvements on the Xperia Z3, but it didn't go far enough. We want proper hardware improvements, rather than awkward software fixes.

Sony is due to release a flagship mobile image sensor, the Exmor RS IMX230 in April 2015 and it is likely that the Xperia Z4 will come with the new sensor.

More power

With a 2.5GHz quad-core Snapdragon 801 processor and 3GB of RAM you might not think the Xperia Z3 was lacking for power, yet in some ways it is. For one thing all that power seemingly hasn't translated into performance, as surprisingly we found a little bit of lag in use, especially when switching between apps.

Z3

It's not a big deal but it does feel less snappy than most other recent flagships despite the specs, which on paper should be more than up to the task. So we're more after increased performance than an actual boost in specs, if it takes improved specs to do that then fine, but if the same thing can be achieved with a bit more optimisation that's fine too.

Having said that superior specs wouldn't be a bad thing either way, as the Snapdragon 801 is starting to look a bit long in the tooth with the Samsung Galaxy Note 4 using a Snapdragon 805 chip and the Snapdragon 810 already hitting the shelves.

Fewer bugs

Another surprising aspect of the Xperia Z3 was just how buggy it seemed, with the keyboard sometimes bouncing or proving unresponsive and the notifications bar occasionally getting stuck half way down.

Hopefully Sony will patch those bugs out of the Xperia Z3 anyway but we'd really rather it makes sure the Xperia Z4 is bug-free before launching it.

Faster camera and autofocus

As long as the light's good the Xperia Z3 can take some exceptional snaps, but one problem with it is actually getting to the point of being able to take a photo, as both launching the camera and the autofocus are a little slower than we'd like.

We're talking milliseconds here, but that can still mean the difference between capturing a moment and missing it, so hopefully the Xperia Z4 will have a snappier snapper.

The new Exmor RS IMX230, which the Xperia Z4 is likely to come with, is claimed by Sony to be the industry's first CMOS image sensor built for smartphones which can track fast-moving subjects thanks to built-in image plane phase detection autofocus.

This new sensor would make the Xperia Z4's camera much better at photographing fast moving subjects.

A new design

We've mentioned that we want smaller bezels but what we'd really like to see is a totally new design. Sony has done a good job of refining its OmniBalance design but there's only so much you can do and with handset after handset sporting fundamentally the same look it's starting to get a bit boring.

Z3 side

Not to mention the fact that for our money both the iPhone 6 and the HTC One M8 look better. So hopefully Sony will do something new and exciting with the Xperia Z4.

Make it metal, give it curves, make it triangular. Ok, maybe not that last one, but we're sure Sony can come up with something, oh and get rid of all those annoying flaps! Most likely it will stick with OmniBalance, but we can dream.

Better Lifelogging

Sony's Lifelogging app is an interesting idea, as it goes beyond just counting steps to also tell you how much running, cycling and sleeping you do and even how long you spend listening to music or watching videos (as long as you do it on your phone).

Essentially as the name suggests it's designed to log your life, but it could do with some improvements. The biggest issue is that it's just not accurate enough, but there are also quirks like the fact that it counts all apps as games, so even if you've never touched a game on your smartphone it will likely peg you as a big mobile gamer.

Plus, while all this information is interesting it doesn't really lead to anything or give you any insights based on the data. If Sony can work on all those things for its Z4 implementation then it could become genuinely useful.

Innovation

Asking for innovation might seem a bit vague, but with smartphones increasingly levelling out when it comes to specs it's innovation that can really help them stand out, so it would be great if the Sony Xperia Z4 had one or more innovative new features.

What those might be is anyone's guess, maybe a scratch proof body, maybe a virtual reality display, probably not a virtual reality display, but something and ideally something that's more than just a gimmick.

Come on Sony, give us a new feature that even Z3 owners will consider upgrading for.


;